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Sleep Dentistry

Dental Sleep Medicine in North Carolina: Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Greenville, Charlotte, & surrounding areas.

Have questions about how to get better sleep, and sleep dentistry? Our dentists took some time to share some information about sleep and sleep dentistry as well as answer common patient questions. View the table of contents below to learn more or find your question and get an answer from one of our dentists!

dr. andy ciecielski

 

 

The following content was provided by Dr. Andy Ciesielski, General Dentist and Dental Sleep Medicine Provider, and has been medically reviewed for accuracy. Some relevant links have been added to audio transcripts to provide resources for additional information.

Do weighted blankets actually help you sleep better?

Answer provided by Dr. Andy Ciesielski. Transcript included below.

 

Dr. Ciesielski:

I haven’t seen a whole lot of research that supports that weighted blankets actually will help you sleep better. There is some research that shows that weighted blankets can help to reduce anxiety and can make people feel more comfortable. But as far as research showing actual improvements in quality of sleep, I haven’t seen that. And in general it isn’t recommended for patients that might have certain conditions where breathing is a concern, particularly sleep apnea, just because the increased weight on your chest can be problematic.

Do blue light glasses actually work? Do blue light glasses help you sleep better?

Answer provided by Dr. Andy Ciesielski. Transcript included below.

 

Dr. Ciesielski:

The blue light glasses potentially could increase the quality of sleep a little bit because cutting down on blue light, particularly in the evening hours when you should be producing melatonin, a lot of blue light can restrict that to an extent.

So you’re wearing glasses that’s going to help to reduce the blue light that’s entering your eyes and it’ll actually help to increase melatonin which can help you sleep. But similarly there’s not a lot of research that shows blue light glasses can provenly improve your sleep. But from a standpoint of increasing melatonin, it’s logical to think that it would.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology, I was just looking this up, says that in particular for eyestrain and macular degeneration and various other eye conditions that the blue light glasses really don’t make much of a difference, but there is some research showing an improvement in melatonin levels in the evening. So for that reason I would say that they can be beneficial.

The only thing I don’t know about and you’d have to check this manufacturer to manufacturer is how well individual brands are successful in blocking out the blue light. But I don’t have any information on which brands may be better than others.

What side should I sleep on to get better sleep? Is there a best side to sleep on?

Answer provided by Dr. Andy Ciesielski. Transcript included below.

 

Dr. Ciesielski:

Generally on your side is better than on your back or prone and generally left side sleeping is preferred to right side sleeping. That’s going to be more important to a small extent for patients that have GERD. If you have reflux at night, left side sleeping is a little bit better.

Interviewer:

Interesting. How and why is that?

Dr. Ciesielski:

It has to do with sphincter control and MDs would probably know a little bit more about it than I would or a sleep doctor, but my understanding of it is that when you sleep on your side that you have better sphincter control so that there’s less likely acid getting into the esophagus.

Interviewer:
That’s cool. That’s good to know, as someone with acid reflux, that’s good to know.

Dr. Ciesielski:

Pretty sure it’s left hand side.