Since starting down the healthy habits road in 2021, we’ve all been hearing how beneficial water is to our bodies and our overall well-being. But let’s talk about specifics! How does water specifically help our teeth? We’re gonna dive in on that question today, read on. 

 

What are my teeth made of?

First, let’s talk about what our teeth are made of. Our teeth are composed of four main tissues: dentin, cementum, pulp, and enamel. Enamel is the outermost layer that is stronger than anything in our bodies (even our bones!) and contains minerals such as calcium phosphate. The next layer is dentin, this is the softer portion of our teeth that is susceptible to cavities. When enamel breaks down, this is where our teeth start to form cavities. Next, the inner core of your tooth is called the pulp – this is where your connective tissue and nerves lie. 

tooth structure

Are Teeth the Same as Bones?

No. The biggest difference between our bones and our teeth is that our bones can heal over time if they break or shatter – teeth cannot. This is why it’s so important to regularly visit your dentist, brush, and floss daily. 

 

So how exactly does drinking water help my teeth? 

Water acts as a neutral party. When coming into contact with acidic drinks like sodas or coffee it helps to neutralize these acidic situations and creates an environment that our teeth enjoy. 

Water also contributes to saliva production and washing away bacteria that like to form on the surfaces of our teeth. If your water contains fluoride, this is also beneficial to your enamel because it hardens the surface – making you less susceptible to cavities.

 

Help Fight Cavities the Easy way

Teeth are slightly porous and do absorb materials – not like a sponge but more like a stone that can be withered away over time. So it’s important for us to maintain a consistent habit of drinking water and essentially ‘flushing’ out the bad particles or acidic materials that can build up over time to create cavities, cause discoloration or yellowing, or lead to periodontal disease. The easiest way to do this? Drink your water, brush & floss daily, and visit your dentist.

 

Have more questions about the benefits of drinking water for your teeth? Learn more on the ADA’s website here.

We’ve all heard the common phrase “milk can build strong bones!” But what does it really mean for your dental health? Seeing as this Saturday, January 11th is National Milk Day, we wanted to take a deeper dive into the world of milk. Join us as we answer questions regarding milk, calcium, and your teeth! 

 

What types of Food contain Calcium?

As we all know, a healthy diet of balanced nutritious food is key to a healthy life. This includes our oral health! According to the ADA, the three most common nutrients needed to build healthy bones and teeth are Calcium, Phosphorous, and Vitamin D. Some Calcium-containing foods are broccoli, cabbage, oranges, salmon, beans, and of course dairy products like yogurt, cheese, and milk. 

 

high calcium food chart

How is Milk Good for My Teeth?

In recent studies, findings have observed that drinking milk can actually help to prevent tooth decay and help strengthen tooth enamel. More specifically, research has shown that milk and dairy products contain a protein called Casein. When combined with calcium and phosphorus, casein creates a protective protein film over the enamel surface of the tooth. This has the ability to reduce the risk of tooth decay and increase enamel strength!

mom and daughter laughing while drinking milk

How Much Milk Should I Be Drinking?

Overall, it’s more important to be intaking a certain amount of calcium in your diet – and not all necessarily from milk. But when it comes down to it, the easiest way to make sure you are getting enough calcium is by having 3 servings of dairy products per day according to the American Heart Association. 

The benefits of drinking milk are not limited to just healthy teeth but also a healthy body. When combined with a nutritious diet full of vitamins and minerals, drinking milk can ultimately lead to lower caries, less chance of tooth loss, and stronger tooth enamel. As always, if you have any questions regarding your oral health and wish to speak to a medical professional, please contact our doctors by filling out our online form or email us at [email protected]

 

Written by: Kaitlin Painter, Digital Marketing & Content Manager